• RoshHashannah

 
Holiday Name        
 Secular Year   2016-17 2017-18 2018- 2019
Jewish Year Hebrew Date 5777 5778 5779
Rosh Hashanah 1-2 Tishrei  Oct. 3-4  Sep. 21-22 Sep. 10-11
Yom Kippur 10 Tishrei Oct. 12 Sep. 30
Sukkot 15-20 Tishrei Oct. 17-23 Oct. 5-11
Shemini Atzeret  22 Tishrei Oct. 24 Oct. 12
Simchat Torah 23 Tishrei Oct. 25  Oct. 13 Oct. 2
Hanukkah 25 Kislev-2 Tevet  Dec. 25- Jan.1 Dec. 13-20
Tu Bishvat 15 Shevat Feb. 11   Jan. 31 Jan. 21
Purim 14 Adar March 12 Mar. 1 Mar. 21
Passover 15-21 Nisan April 11-18 March 31- Apr. 7
Yom Hashoah 27 Nisan April 23 Apr. 12
Yom Ha’atzmaut 5 Iyar May 2 Apr. 19 May 9
Lag Ba’omer 18 Iyar May 14 May 3 May 23
Shavuot 6-7 Sivan May 31-June 1  May 20-21 June 9-10
Tisha B’Av 9 Av Aug. 1 July 22 Aug. 11
 
 
Calendar Fun Fact

Jews often say: "The holidays are late this year" or "The holidays are early this year." In fact, the holidays never are early or late; they are always on time, according to the Jewish calendar.

Unlike the Gregorian (civil) calendar, which is baed on the sun (solar), the Jewish calendar is based primarily on the moon (lunar), with periodic adjustments made to account for the differences between the solar and lunar cycles. Therefore, the Jewish calendar might be described as both solar and lunar. The moon takes an average of twenty-nine and one-half days to complete its cycle; twelve lunar months equal 354 days. A solar year is 365 1/4 days. There is a difference of eleven days per year. To ensure that the Jewish holidays always fall in the proper season, an extra month is added to the Hebrew calendar seven times out of every nineteen years. If this were not done, the fall harvest festival of Sukkot, for instance, would sometimes be celebrated in the summer, or the spring holiday of Passover would sometimes occur in the winter.

  • Selichot

    Selichot

    Selichot, a Hebrew word meaning "forgiveness" begins on the Saturday before Rosh HaShanah. It helps to establish the mindset of inner awareness and repentance in readiness for the High Holy Days.   Learn more about the history and rituals of Read More
  • Rosh Hashanah

    Rosh Hashanah

    Rosh HaShanah (literally, "Head of the Year") is the celebration of the Jewish New Year, observed on the first day of the Hebrew month of Tishrei. It marks the beginning of a ten-day period of prayer, self-examination and repentance, culminating Read More
  • Yom Kippur

    Yom Kippur

    Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, marks the end of the 10 day period known as the Days of Repentance. The day is devoted to repentance for sins committed over the course of the previous year. A Yizkor memorial service Read More
  • Sukkot

    Sukkot

    Sukkot begins five days after Yom Kippur and is named after the booths or huts (sukkot in Hebrew) in which Jews are supposed to dwell during this week-long celebration. It is one of the three major pilgrimage festivals of ancient Read More
  • Simchat Torah

    Simchat Torah

    Simchat Torah, which means “Rejoicing in Torah,” occurs on the last day of Sukkot. It is a celebration marking the conclusion of one and the beginning of another annual cycle of reading from the Torah.  On Erev Simchat Torah we Read More
  • Hanukkah

    Hanukkah

    Hanukkah, or the Festival of Rededication, celebrates the rededication of the Temple in Jerusalem in 164 BCE.  We celebrate by lighting one more candle on the chanukiah after each day of Hanukkah. We eat foods cooked in oil, such as Read More
  • Tu BiSh'vat

    Tu BiSh'vat

    Tu BiSh’vat, also called the New Year of the Trees, is observed on the 15th (tu) day of Sh’vat. Scholars believe that Tu BiSh'vat was originally an agricultural festival, marking the emergence of spring. After the destruction of the Temple Read More
  • Purim

    Purim

    Purim, or the Feast of Lots, is a joyous holiday that is recounted in the Book of Esther. It tells of the saving of the Jews during the Persian Period (539-330BCE). Purim is celebrated by the reading of the Scroll Read More
  • Passover

    Passover

    The Haggadah transforms us into storytellers; we are the feeders of history. We enlighten, impart, lead, and illuminate one another with lively discussions and creative Seders. Passover is an exquisite opportunity to tell the stories of our people, to remind Read More
  • Yom Ha Shoah

    Yom Ha Shoah

    Children and adults join together in the sacred task of memory and hope as we remember together the destruction of European Jewry. Survivors of the Shoah, together with our students, witness together the possibilities of courage, goodness and hope.   Read More
  • Lag Ba'Omer

    Lag Ba'Omer

    The period between Pesach and Shavuot is called the “Counting of the Omer” (sefirat ha’omer), after the ancient rite of the bringing of the first sheaf (omer) of the barley harvest to the priest (Lev. 23:9-14). Lag Ba'Omer is the shorthand Read More
  • Tisha B'Av

    Tisha B'Av

    Tisha B’Av, the ninth (Tisha) of Av, commemorates the destruction of both Temples (the first in 586 BCE and the second in 70 CE).  A brief history of the building and destruction of the First and Second Temples. The First Read More
  • Shavout

    Shavout

    Shavuot is one of the three major pilgrimage festivals of ancient Israel and occurs seven weeks after Passover.  Shavuot marks the giving of the Torah at Mount Sinai. Like so many other Jewish holidays, Shavuot began as an ancient agricultural Read More
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Jewish Holidays

Jul
31

07.31.2017

Aug
1

08.01.2017

Sep
20

09.20.2017

Sep
21

09.21.2017

Sep
22

09.22.2017

Sep
29

09.29.2017

Sep
30

09.30.2017

Oct
4

10.04.2017

Oct
5

10.05.2017

Oct
6

10.06.2017

Oct
7

10.07.2017

Oct
8

10.08.2017

Oct
9

10.09.2017

Oct
10

10.10.2017

Oct
11

10.11.2017

Oct
12

10.12.2017

Oct
13

10.13.2017

Dec
12

12.12.2017

Dec
13

12.13.2017

Dec
14

12.14.2017